Expressive Language Developmental Milestones help measure how your child communicates either through gestures, vocalizations or words.

Age

Milestone

12 months Your child should use anywhere from one to three words.
18 months Your child should repeat some overheard words and begin to try to communicate with more words than gestures.
2 years Your child should join words into phrases such as "more ball" or "bye mama".
2½ years Your child should begin to use short phrases 3-4 words in length.
3 years Your child should have a vocabulary of approximately 1000 words and be about 75% intelligible.
3½ years Your child should be able to name pictures in a book, tell how an object is used, and use posessives.
4 years Your child should be about 95% intelligible, even to unfamiliar listeners.
4½ years Your child should be able to respond to "where" questions and complete analogies.
5½ years Your child should be able to repeat sentences, use adjectives to describe objects, use past tense forms of verbs (-ed), and describe similarities.
6½ years Your child should be able to define words, rhyme words, and repair grammatical errors.

Return to Top

 

Speech Developmental Milestones are provided to demonstrate an age when particular speech sounds should be mastered.

Age Milestone
3 m, n, h, p, f, w, b, and d
4 k, g, and t
5 j and v
6 ing, l, s, r, ch, z, th, and sh

Return to Top

 

Receptive Language Developmental Milestones help measure what your child understands of comprehends

Age

Milestone

12 months Your child should recognize the names of simple, common objects, familiar people, and action verbs.
18 months Your child should understand new words each week, identify pictures in a book, know a few major body parts, and identify some common objects.
2 years Your child should recgognize many common objects and pictures when named. They should also be able to follow several simple directions.
3 years Your child should be able to listen to simple stories, follow a two step command, and understand the concept of taking turns.
4 years Your child should be able to correctly identify colors, understand "more" and "most", and make inferences.
5 years Your child should understand time concepts, understand qualitative concepts, and understand "-er" as "one who does something".
6 years Your child should understand passive voice tense, identify objects that don't belong, and be able to order pictures from largest to smallest.

Return to Top